Anal Warts

Anal warts look and feel like hard, fleshy lumps in the anal area. They can cause discomfort as well as embarrassment.

Anal warts are a prevalent condition that affects both men and women.

This post will discuss everything you need to know about anal warts, including their symptoms, causes, and how to treat them. We will also discuss the difference between anal warts and haemorrhoids to be sure to get the correct diagnosis if you are experiencing any symptoms.

#1 What Is The Difference?

Both anal warts and hemorrhoids are common problems that affect the anal area, but there is a big difference between the two.

Although they may be confused with haemorrhoids, anal warts are entirely different, as warts are caused by a virus but haemorrhoids are not at all contagious. Anal warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) and are soft, cauliflower-like growths that can occur anywhere around or inside the anus.

#2 What Are The Symptoms?

Anal warts are small, fleshy growths that can develop on the anus. They are caused by a virus called human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a widespread virus, and almost everyone will be infected with it at some point in their life. There are many different types of HPV, but only a few of them cause anal warts.

The symptoms of anal warts can vary from person to person. They may not always be visible, and they can sometimes go unnoticed. However, some common symptoms include:

  • Lump or growth on the anus
  • Itching around the anus
  • Pain or discomfort when passing urine
  • Bleeding after passing a bowel motion
  • Swelling and inflammation around the anus.

#3 What Causes Anal Warts?

Anal warts are caused by a virus called human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a very common virus, and almost everyone will be infected with it at some point in their life. There are many different types of HPV, but the kind that causes anal warts is called HPV-16.

HPV is spread through sexual contact. This includes anal and vaginal sex, as well as oral sex. It can also be spread through skin-to-skin contact, for example, if you touch an infected area and then touch another part of your body.

#4 How To Treat Anal Warts

Anal warts, also called condylomas, are small bumps forming on or around the anus. A virus causes them, and they’re very contagious. So if you think you have anal warts, it’s best to seek attention.

There are several ways to treat anal warts:

  • Prescription cream or ointment, which needs to be applied 2-3 times a day for a couple of weeks
  • Cryotherapy freezing treatment
  • Electrocautery or microcautery treatment
  • Surgical removal in a minor procedure using only local anaesthetic

Some people choose not to treat anal warts, thinking that they will go away independently. But this is not always the case. Anal warts can grow and spread, and, left untreated; they may cause other health problems. You are also at risk of passing them onto partners. Therefore, it’s essential to get treated if you have anal warts.

If you are pregnant and have anal warts, it’s vital to see a doctor. Anal warts can spread to the baby during delivery and can cause health problems for the baby.

In conclusion, anal warts are a common sexually transmitted infection that can be embarrassing and uncomfortable to deal with. However, there is no need to feel ashamed or embarrassed, as the condition is very treatable.

Get in Touch

Telephone:

020 3340 0304

Mon-Fri: 9am – 5.30pm, Sat: 9am – 2pm

Harley Street Clinic:

41 Harley Street,
London, W1G 8QH

City of London Clinic:

42 New Broad Street,
London, EC2M 1JD

Putney Clinic:

4 Disraeli Road, Putney, 
London, SW15 2DS